Fireworks illegal in Dover

posted on: 6/26/2020

Police Chief William Breault and Fire Chief Paul Haas are reminding residents that consumer fireworks are not only dangerous, but also illegal to possess and discharge in the City of Dover.

According to city ordinances, "no person, firm, partnership or corporation shall offer for sale, expose for sale, sell at retail, purchase, possess, transport, use or explode any fireworks without a permit."

Permits in Dover are only granted for programs and displays approved by the Fire and Rescue Chief and the Police Chief using Class C fireworks. All displays must be conducted by a trained operator who holds a current license or State of New Hampshire certificate of competency.

With professional fireworks displays cancelled due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic in many communities, including Dover, officials are reminding people that consumer fireworks are dangerous.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, fireworks started an estimated 19,500 fires in 2018, including 1,900 structure fires, 500 vehicle fires, and 17,100 outside and other fires. These fires caused five deaths, 46 civilian injuries, and $105 million in direct property damage.

Fireworks illegal in Dover

posted on: 6/26/2020

Police Chief William Breault and Fire Chief Paul Haas are reminding residents that consumer fireworks are not only dangerous, but also illegal to possess and discharge in the City of Dover.

According to city ordinances, "no person, firm, partnership or corporation shall offer for sale, expose for sale, sell at retail, purchase, possess, transport, use or explode any fireworks without a permit."

Permits in Dover are only granted for programs and displays approved by the Fire and Rescue Chief and the Police Chief using Class C fireworks. All displays must be conducted by a trained operator who holds a current license or State of New Hampshire certificate of competency.

With professional fireworks displays cancelled due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic in many communities, including Dover, officials are reminding people that consumer fireworks are dangerous.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, fireworks started an estimated 19,500 fires in 2018, including 1,900 structure fires, 500 vehicle fires, and 17,100 outside and other fires. These fires caused five deaths, 46 civilian injuries, and $105 million in direct property damage.

In 2018, U.S. hospital emergency rooms treated an estimated 9,100 people for fireworks related injuries; half of those injuries were to the extremities and 34 percent were to the eye or other parts of the head. Children younger than 15 years of age accounted for more than one-third (36 percent) of the estimated 2018 injuries.

In addition to the threat of fire and injury, fireworks can also trigger episodes of post-traumatic stress disorder in some of our veterans and cause extreme distress for pets.

There are many safe alternatives to fireworks, including:

  • Glow sticks
  • Red and blue bubbles
  • Silly string
  • Confetti
  • Party crackers
  • Pinwheels

For more information, contact Dover Fire and Rescue at 516-6148.